How a labor shortage may impact American's ability to get quality long-term care

  According to the latest unemployment numbers,  the U.S. unemployment is at a low rate of 4.1% and many companies are having a hard time finding workers. This good news for job seekers may have some scary implications for people needing help with care in the future. Much of the labor shortage is for highly skilled workers in fields such as technology and advanced manufacturing. However, the labor shortage also affects so-called "lower skilled" work such as trucking and retail. In fact, many people are worried that this is a long-term trend that could impact future growth opportunities in this country.
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When Nursing Homes Push Out Our Poor and Disabled Patients

  Note:  This is a republished article from Kaiser Health News describing the financial challenges facing Long-term care in America Jocelyn Wiener, Kaiser Health News Anita Willis says the social worker offered her a painful choice: She could either leave the San Jose, Calif., nursing home where she’d spent a month recovering from a stroke — or come up with $336 a day to stay on. She had until midnight to decide.
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LTC 101 - The Basics of LTC Insurance

For someone looking at planning for care, they often become confused about how LTC Insurance works.  The non-profit LIFE foundation, (www.lifehappens.org) have created a simple video and guide to LTC Insurance. Check out the video and the link to the guide below.
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The surprising tax deductibility of LTC Insurance

Do you  own LTC Insurance or are you considering purchasing a plan?  Then you need to know about the important tax advantages of long-term care insurance.   A surprising number of policyholders have the ability to deduct premiums, and those insured also find that the amount of premium that can be deducted increases each year. A big reason is that more and more buyers of LTCI also own Health Savings Accounts and can pay premiums with pre-tax dollars. It's important to understand that when we are talking about the tax-advantages, we are talking about "tax-qualified" LTC Insurance.  Tax qualified LTC Insurance was codified by the IRS in 1996 as part of the original HIPAA legislation.  Under section, 7702B, LTC plans that meet certain requirements are considered tax-qualified.  Almost 100% of current standalone LTC Insurance sold are tax-qualified, and many riders on life insurance plans are tax-qualified as well.  
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Obamacare, Medicare and Long Term Care

  We know from the news that people frequently confuse "The Affordable Care Act" and "Obamacare" - even though they are the same thing. In addition, people don't understand how long-term care, or custodial care, is also covered.  Here are some of facts about how long-term care is covered by health insurance programs.
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5 great reasons to check long-term care insurance off your to-do list

Don't let 'later' become 'never.' Today is the day!  5 great reasons to check long term care insurance off your to-do list. 
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ADL dependent Goldfish receives cost effective LTC!

Photo used with permission Twitter @taylorndean  Youtube: taylordeandaily 
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Planning ahead for the future you want

When you sit down and imagine your future, what do you see? Are you enjoying your retirement in a warm weather location or perhaps in your current home close to family and friends? Are you participating in the activities you’ve always enjoyed?
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How a long-term care insurance policy works—in layman’s terms

When you prepare for any upcoming investment or purchase, you probably run into some unfamiliar language or terminology in your research which can be frustrating and downright confusing. Searching for a long-term care insurance policy is no different. A LTC insurance policy describes coverage under the policy, exclusions and limitations—and can be laden with industry jargon. Here’s a breakdown of the fundamentals—in terms we hope are easy to understand.
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The Good Daughter; a caregiver's Long Term Care story.

Nearly 20 years ago, when my children were toddlers, my mother came to live with us.  She was retired and in good health, but it was no longer feasible for her to live alone in her neighborhood.  I thought, “How bad could it be?  She’s a gourmet cook, a talented pianist.  It will be good for the kids.  Maybe it will be good for all of us.”  And so she moved.  We gave her our master bedroom and turned the third floor office of our Victorian house into our room.  Two weeks later, she had a massive stroke and lost much of the movement on her right side.  And now I had another role:  wife, mother, professional and caregiver.
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